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  • Pharma: How Drug Companies Mislead Doctors and Harm Patients. by Ben Goldacre

    Bad Pharma: How Drug Companies Mislead Doctors and Harm Patients. by Ben Goldacre


    ‘Bad Science’ hilariously exposed the tricks that quacks and journalists use to distort science, becoming a 400,000 copy bestseller. Now Ben Goldacre puts the $600bn global pharmaceutical industry under the microscope. What he reveals is a fascinating, terrifying mess. Doctors and patients need good scientific evidence to make informed decisions. But instead, companies run bad trials on their own drugs, which distort and exaggerate the benefits by design. When these trials produce unflatterin…

  • & Lee: How I Came to Know

    Me & Lee: How I Came to Know, Love and Lose Lee Harvey Oswald


    Judyth Vary was once a promising science student who dreamed of finding a cure for cancer; this exposé is her account of how she strayed from a path of mainstream scholarship at the University of Florida to a life of espionage in New Orleans with Lee Harvey Oswald. In her narrative she offers extensive documentation on how she came to be a cancer expert at such a young age, the personalities who urged her to relocate to New Orleans, and what led to her involvement in the development of a biol…

  • Alliance: The CIA

    Dark Alliance: The CIA, the Contras, and the Crack Cocaine Explosion


    Major Motion Picture based on Dark Alliance and starring Jeremy Renner, “Kill the Messenger,” to be be released in Fall 2014 Winner of the 1999 PEN/Oakland Censorship Award Winner of the 1999 Firecracker Alternative Bookseller (FAB) Award, Politics category Finalist for the 1999 Bay Area Book Reviewers AwardsDark Alliance is a book that should be fiction, whose characters seem to come straight out of central casting: the international drug lord, Norwin Meneses; the Contra cocaine broker with …

  • Israel Lobby and U.S. Foreign Policy

    The Israel Lobby and U.S. Foreign Policy


    The Israel Lobby,” by John J. Mearsheimer of the University of Chicago and Stephen M. Walt of Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government, was one of the most controversial articles in recent memory. Originally published in the London Review of Books in March 2006, it provoked both howls of outrage and cheers of gratitude for challenging what had been a taboo issue in America: the impact of the Israel lobby on U.S. foreign policy. Now in a work of major importance, Mearsheimer and Walt dee…

  • Pharma: How Drug Companies Mislead Doctors and Harm Patients

    Bad Pharma: How Drug Companies Mislead Doctors and Harm Patients


    We like to imagine that medicine is based on evidence and the results of fair testing and clinical trials. In reality, those tests and trials are often profoundly flawed. We like to imagine that doctors who write prescriptions for everything from antidepressants to cancer drugs to heart medication are familiar with the research literature about a drug, when in reality much of the research is hidden from them by drug companies. We like to imagine that doctors are impartially educated, when in …

  • Whistleblower: Sex Trafficking

    The Whistleblower: Sex Trafficking, Military Contractors, and One Woman’s Fight for Justice


    When Nebraska police officer and divorced mother of three Kathryn Bolkovac saw a recruiting announcement for private military contractor DynCorp International, she applied and was hired. Good money, world travel, and the chance to help rebuild a war-torn country sounded like the perfect job. Bolkovac was shipped out to Bosnia, where DynCorp had been contracted to support the UN peacekeeping mission. She was assigned as a human rights investigator, heading the gender affairs unit. The lack of …

  • of an Economic Hit Man

    Confessions of an Economic Hit Man


    “Economic hit men,” John Perkins writes, “are highly paid professionals who cheat countries around the globe out of trillions of dollars. Their tools include fraudulent financial reports, rigged elections, payoffs, extortion, sex, and murder.”John Perkins should know—he was an economic hit man. His job was to convince countries that are strategically important to the U.S.—from Indonesia to Panama—to accept enormous loans for infrastructure development, and to make sure that the lucrative proj…